Tag Archives: John Burroughs

How To Cure The Non-Hiking Blues

“I go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put in order.”

-John Burroughs

I came across the following statement/question as I was perusing a Facebook page that dealt with hiking earlier:

How do you guys deal with the “9-5” grind? I literally can’t focus on anything else except going on my next hike. And I find that I struggle to deal with all of the bullshit that coworkers are.

So how do you deal with the constant urge to get out and hike during the workday? Obviously, you need money not only to live but to be able to go out on the adventures that you find yourself focusing on during the workday. So what you have to do is get it out of your mind is to use your time after the work day to get ready for that next hike.

What can you do after work and in between hikes? Here’s a list:

  1. Keep your gear in good condition. Clean your pack inside and out. Hang it to dry if you were hiking in the rain.
  2. Clean your boots. Check your laces for frays, if they are wet, set them somewhere to dry. Don’t put them near a heat source because the excessive dry heat could damage them.
  3. Replace anything that you used on the hike. First aid equipment, duct tape, sunscreen and especially TP.
  4. Figure out how to work that GPS that you bought and never figured out.
  5. Clean your trekking poles.
  6. If needed, clean your maps.
  7. Plan your next hike. And the one after that and the one after that. I do this and it allows me to focus on my work during the day and my hikes at night.
  8. Clean your hiking clothes every so often. Now I get it that if you are on a three or four-day adventure, you might start to smell. But day hikers really have no reason to smell like a thru-hiker.
  9. Learn how to use a compass and try navigating a hike.
  10. Plan hikes you might not necessarily go on. For instance, I almost never hike in the rain. This year, my goal is to do exactly that as often as I can.
  11. Read anything and everything on the internet about hiking. New gear, hikes, thru-hiker stories, wilderness first aid, hikers blogs.
  12. Youtube is a fascinating outlet for people doing everything that I have listed above. As with everything else the quality of some videos are not as good as others, but following AT and PCT thru hiker vlogs are a wonder in themselves.
  13. If you photograph or video your hikes, make sure your batteries are charged and your gear is ready to go.
  14. If you can’t get outside to hike or walk, get on a stationary bike to get in shape for those spring hikes.

So there you go, If all you can do is think about hiking at work, do it at home. Not only will you save yourself trouble at your job but you will also be better prepared for your next outdoor adventure.

Isn’t that what it’s all about?

HAPPY HIKING!!!

A Winter Hike to the Nose

“Winter is a season of recovery and preparation.”

-Paul Theroux

“He who marvels at the beauty of the world in summer will find equal cause for wonder and admiration in winter.”

-John Burroughs

“Let us love winter, for it is the spring of genius.”

-Pietro Aretino

You know it’s going to be a good hike when your long time hiking buddy shows up at the trail head and after a good twelve hours of snow, freezing rain and rain, it all just stops! Ten minutes later the sun is out. You couldn’t ask for anything better.

Yes, I headed back up to Anthony’s Nose on a day that started off slushy, icy and nasty. As I looked up the trail, I have to admit that I was a little worried noticing that it was all a sheet of ice. With that said, after about 200 yards, the trail became more slushy which made it much more manageable.

img_2327

12/24/16-The start of the climb to Anthony’s Nose. 

img_2325

12/24/16-A quick 180 degree turn from the picture above looking back towards the start.

Since I have not been up to the Nose this late in December for a couple of years, I really forgot about how the views drastically change now that the trees are bare. You get an entirely different perspective on winter hiking.

img_2326

12/24/16-A view you would never get during the summer!

img_2331

12/24/16-The Nose in the distance as seen from the Appalachian Trail. This is the only time of year you get this view of the Nose.

 

Once I got to the top I was pleasantly surprised with the awesome views that were waiting. for me! The difference between pictures during the summer and now are incredible. Once again, this is why I love this hike!

img_2334

12/24/16-Iona Island to the lower left and Bear Mt. to the right.

img_2335

Dunderberg Mt.

IMG_2337.JPG

Bear Mt. and the Bear Mt. bridge to the right.

img_2341

img_2347

img_2369

img_2360

img_2361

img_2367

Bear Mt. 

img_2371

Another viewpoint, just off of the Nose looking North towards West Point.

img_2372

Sugarloaf as seen from the alternate viewpoint.

img_2373

A tighter view looking North on the Hudson.

img_2374

A small pond, now frozen, that you see on the way up and down from th Nose.

As always, any hike to the Nose is a good one. If you want to, go back to my posts in July and August to get a good look at the differences in the terrain depending on the season.

Happy Hiking!!!